Þjóðviljinn 15th August 1969

‘Desmond Bagley writes a book that is set here’.

Desmond Bagley Icelandic media article from thjodviljinn 15th August 1969.

Four adventure books by British author Desmond Bagley, which have been translated into Icelandic, have gained popularity and the author of the books is now here in this country to prepare for the next book.

Desmond Bagley arrived on 22nd July and went from here to Greenland, where he stayed for three days. Since then he has travelled Iceland with his wife and has decided that the setting for the next book, the eighth, will be in this country. At a press conference Bagley said he had travelled highways throughout the country, but said that the barren landscape stimulates the imagination of how one could find their way into danger, and Bagley was then, of course, thinking of a character first and foremost in mind.

His books that have been published in Icelandic are Gullkjölurinn (The Golden Keel) drawn up in Johannesburg and published here in 1965. His next book Fjallavirkið (High Citadel) was released in Icelandic last year and 1967 was a Fellibylur (Wyatt’s Hurricane). Skriðan (Landslide) is a book Bagley published by Suðri, like the books for last Christmas. Bagley’s fifth book, Viveróbréfið (The Vivero Letter), is in print here and will be released this fall. The sixth book, The Spoilers, published in English and set mostly in Antarctica, the upcoming seventh book will be set mostly here.

Torfi Ólafsson translated Gullkjölurinn (The Golden Keel) and  Fjallavirkið (High Citadel) and Gisli Ólafsson Fellibylur (Wyatt’s Hurricane) and Skriðan (Landslide) (Gisli also translated Eitursmyglarar (The Spoilers). The books published here have sold 2500 copies and  Skriðan (Landslide) went on sale a few weeks ago. Bagley’s books have been translated into 15 languages and he has already sold the rights to film three of his novels.

Read about the failed film production of Running Blind


Notes

1. Þjóðviljinn (1969). ‘Desmond Bagley skrifar bók sem hann lætur gerast hér’ (15th August 1969 p. 10).